Sunday, March 7, 2010

Valois tapestries


As evident in my web design, I am fond of tapestries, and sat for a few hours to look at the Bayeux Tapestries in that dimly lit, cold room in France. I guess others have done the same thing, as there are bleachers to sit on while taking in the enormity of all that art.
This tapestry, adjacent, is part of the Valois Tapestries, one of a series of eight tapestries depicting events in the French court during the 16th century. It was possibly owned at one time by Catherine de’Medici, but was not listed as a possession in the inventory of her belongings after her death.
The tapestry was based on designs by Antoine Caron, a 15th c. artist, and a second artist, possibly Lucas de Heere, who altered Caron's designs. Some historians believe that the presence of Turks alongside the Huguenots (Calvinists, or French protestants), indicates that both groups were considered to be infidels by the Valois rulers. This tapestry depicts the meeting of the Valois and Habsburg courts at Bayonne. The whale is spouting red wine.

6 comments:

Clover Autrey said...

Interesting Joyce. So why is the whale spouting wine? Just whimsy?

Jacqueline Seewald said...

Hi, Joyce,

I very much enjoyed reading your blog. Lots of interesting information. I was a social studies minor back in the day and still enjoy anything historical. My next Five Star novel will be an historical romance, but not medieval.

Joyce Moore said...

Clover: I'm just guessing, but since the tapestry represents a festivity, I'm thinking a fountain spouted wine. After all, it was a party in a royal mansion, and they loved their wine. Thanks for stopping by.

Joyce Moore said...

Hi Jacqueline: I clicked on your profile to see about your next release, but your home page wasn't there (I guess I mean your website, not home page). Why not add it to your profile? That way people could click and go right to your site. I just wondered about your upcoming release from Five Star (when, title, period.)

Mary Ricksen said...

I think they are beautiful! the work and love put into those tapestries is phenomenal.

Joyce Moore said...

Hi Mary: I agree. I love to browse tapestries in wikimedia commons, and see where they are--all over the world. And many have amazing stories behind them, some political, like the Valois tapestries.